commercial fashion photo shoot in Kingston upon Thames

Commercial fashion photo shoot in Kingston

Commercial fashion photo shoot for Mimi Florence Designs

Mimi Florence Designs is run by a gifted mother of three beautiful kids. She loves to crochet and make jewellery. Each item is custom made for the client. We set up a commercial fashion photo shoot to provide high quality images for her.

Personally I would describe designs from Mimi Florence as “extremely flattering for ladies who have lots of self confidence”. I mean particularly women who feel good about their bodies.

But look at my images from the photo shoot, and judge for yourself.

Commercial fashion photo shoot for Mimi Florence Designs, photography by Ian Trayner Commercial fashion photo shoot for Mimi Florence Designs, photography by Ian Trayner Commercial fashion photo shoot for Mimi Florence Designs, photography by Ian Trayner Commercial fashion photo shoot for Mimi Florence Designs, photography by Ian Trayner Commercial fashion photo shoot for Mimi Florence Designs, photography by Ian Trayner Commercial fashion photo shoot for Mimi Florence Designs, photography by Ian Trayner

 

 

Commercial fashion photo shoot for Mimi Florence Designs, photography by Ian TraynerCommercial fashion photo shoot for Mimi Florence Designs, photography by Ian Trayner

Commercial fashion photo shoot for Mimi Florence Designs, photography by Ian TraynerCommercial fashion photo shoot for Mimi Florence Designs, photography by Ian Trayner

Technical info about setting up this commercial fashion photo shoot

Shooting high key in the studio

For the high key shots I used pretty standard high key lighting. I used two flash heads for lighting the white background, one on each side. These were each fitted with a tall slim softboxes. For the key light I used a 1m deep octaganol softbox with grid. I angled the key light with care so that it gave (a) flattering directional light on the models and (b) a good spread of light on the ground at their feet.

Yollanda’s hair obliged me to move the key light to the “less convenient” side of my studio, that is to say the right hand side, looking at the model from the camera. This side is less convenient solely because of the shape of my studio, and there is less room for putting lights on the right than on the left. If I had not done this, I would have been struggling with a shadow on Yollanda’s face from her hair (because her hair has a parting on her left, which is the right as you look at her from the camera).

Shooting outdoors using natural light

When we went outdoors I used only natural light. The location is the garden at the back of my photo studio in Kingston upon Thames. If you look at the very last photo, Michelle’s eyes are looking more or less in the direction of the sun, which was already quite low in the sky. Michelle is the model with slightly wavy hair, who is wearing the pink top. The models were sitting in dappled shade under a tree. Because sometimes the sun threw displeasing bright patches of light on the models, I had an assistant (actually it was Venus, the make up artist) hold up a semi-translucent screen between the sun and the models.

Also, because I needed more light coming onto the models from camera left, I had another assistant hold up a large white reflective screen (by large, I mean something like 6 feet by 4 feet). This threw just the right amount of light back onto the models faces. This combination gave a very pleasing natural light effect. Unless you were an experienced photographer, you probably wouldn’t notice that the ambient light had been “modified”.

The creative team behind this photo shoot

Photographer: Ian Trayner
Models: Yollanda Musa and Michelle Chaxs
Make up: Venus (search instagram for @_makeupby_vee_)
Designer: Mimi Florence Designs

family photo shoot, photography in Kingston

Family photo shoot in Kingston upon Thames

Would you like your family photo shoot in the studio, or on location?

Why not both?

All my photo shoots, whether they are a family photo shoot, a commercial shoot, or a fashion shoot, are custom designed for my clients.

“Emma’s Diary”

I am primarily a baby and family photographer, and I work in association with “Emma’s Diary“. That means I have special offers for customers who come from Emma’s Diary. It also means I can enter photos of their babies into the “Baby of the Month” competition that is run in association with Emma’s Diary. Each month 5 lucky parents receive £100 Mothercare vouchers, and there is a rather more substantial prize of £5,000 at the end of each year, for the “Baby of the Year”.

Recently I did a photo shoot with a young family who came to me via Emma’s Diary, and they wanted to enter their baby into the “Baby of the Month” competition.

Bespoke family photography

Everyone who books me for a photo shoot is entitled to a “pre-shoot consultation”. This is when I talk through the photo shoot with my client. We talk about what style of photography to use, and what they want to end up with at the end of their photo shoot.These consultations are best done face to face in my photo studio. However (not surprisingly) most pregnant mums, or new mums, prefer to do it over the phone. We can also exchange images by e-mail.

(Many clients don’t really know what they want to end up with, so one of my roles is to talk through the various options).

So… mum and I discussed how to approach this “baby photo shoot”. Very quickly this turned into a “family photo shoot plus baby”.  And shortly after that, it became a “location photo shoot” as well as a “studio photo shoot”. Not bad progress for just a few minutes of chatting.

I love having the luxury of being able to  design my photo shoots in a bespoke manner for individual clients. I am also able to give my customers the time they need to capture the images they want.

Shooting on location

We drove to a location just a few minutes from my studio. The result is some beautiful images of a very photogenic family, in a photogenic location, with a very, very cute baby (he has the most amazing eyes).

Would you like to hire me for your family photo shoot?

Click this link to find out about booking your own  “professional photo shoot“.
family photo shoot on location in Kingston upon Thames, Surrey family photo shoot on location in Kingston upon Thames, Surrey family photo shoot on location in Kingston upon Thames, Surrey family photo shoot on location in Kingston upon Thames, Surrey family photo shoot on location in Kingston upon Thames, Surrey family photo shoot on location in Kingston upon Thames, Surrey

 

 Health and safety…

I hope you might be amused by this photoshop trickery

family photo shoot in my studio in Kingston upon Thames, Surreyfamily photo shoot in my studio in Kingston upon Thames, Surrey

flour photo shoot in Kingston upon Thames

Flour photo shoot in Kingston upon Thames

Why do a flour photo shoot outdoors?

Flour photo shoots make a LOT of mess! Originally I invited model and performance artist Katie Berns to do this photo shoot in my studio, which is in Kingston upon Thames. But after doing a bit of research I realised just how much mess it was going to make! So I changed my plan, and we did the flour photo shoot in the garden. This was very easy to arrange, because the studio opens directly onto the garden through some wide doors.

The day after we did this flour photo shoot, there was a lot of flour in the garden, and because it had got damp, it was sticking quite stubbornly to plants and other things. All my clothes pegs got flour stuck all over them. There are still signs of the flour now as I write these words, three months after we did the flour shoot.

What made this flour photo shoot so challenging?

What made this particular flour photo shoot really challenging was the extreme cold. We did the shoot in early March, and it was VERY cold by (South East) British standards. Although it was above freezing, it was only above freezing by a few degrees, and the air was damp. It felt extremely cold even to me, and I was fully dressed. Poor old Katie – I was seriously worried about her wellbeing. But she was extremely professional, and totally dedicated to capturing some stunning images.

It was also threatening to rain the whole evening, but fortunately the rain held off – all except a few small drops. If it had rained hard, we would have abandoned the flour part of the photo shoot. (We also did some ballet and dance photography in the studio, earlier in the day, before it got dark).

When Katie got too cold, she put on my thick fluffy dressing gown and headed indoors to warm up and stop shivering. She was very brave, and I was very impressed by her professionalism and fortitude. I have to add that she could have stopped at any time.

How to do a flour photo shoot

From a technical point of view a flour photo shoot is very straightforward. You don’t need a particularly high shutter speed. I was using 1/200s, so there aren’t any problems with syncing a studio flash.

As with any other photo shoot, the photographer will arrange the lighting according to the image you wish to create. The flour in flour photo shoots is usually lit from behind, against a dark background. But this is just a matter of taste. I think when the background is dark, or black, the contrast of the white flour against the dark background is extreme, so this tends to give dramatic images. My personal preference was to avoid putting a powerful light on my model from the front. I wanted to have sufficient light to see Katie, but I wanted most of the impact of the images to be from the light on the flour, and the rim lighting along the sides of Katie’s body – and through her hair.

When I was researching how to do a flour photo shoot, I discovered there are quite a lot of descriptions available on the web (now there’s a surprise!) I am not the first photographer to do flour shoots by a long chalk.  If you go online you can find images similar to these. However next time I intend to add a bit more photographic creativity!

Because I wanted a dark background, it made sense to do the flour photo shoot after dark. Next day my neighbour said he had wondered why there was so much lightening during the night, but no thunder!

Is it possible to hire me to do your very own flour photo shoot?

Absolutely. This would be a “standard photo shoot”, so visit this page to see my rates.

flour photo shoot in Kingston upon Thames, photography by Ian Trayner, model is Katie Berns

Flour photo shoot with Katie Berns performing amazingly in freezing cold and damp conditions

flour photo shoot in Kingston upon Thames, Surrey flour photo shoot in Kingston upon Thames, Surrey flour photo shoot in Kingston upon Thames, Surrey flour photo shoot in Kingston upon Thames, Surrey flour photo shoot in Kingston upon Thames, Surrey

 

Technical information

F8, ISO 400, 1/200s

I used three studio flash heads. It doesn’t matter which ones you use, but I had the luxury of using three Ilux 600 Summit heads. These are 600 Watt flash heads, and they are battery powered, so they are fully portable. I bought mine from Photomart, and rather annoyingly, they have come down a lot in price since I bought mine!

The flour was lit from both sides behind Katie. This had the effect of putting bright lighting on the flour,  and they also cast a beautiful rim light on Katie Berns’s body. The modifiers on these lights probably aren’t critical, as long as you can control the spread of light. I was lucky because I could use a tall thin soft box with grid on both sides.

I also had a fill light in front of Katie, near the camera. I don’t remember the ratio of the fill light to the rear lights, but the rear lights were significantly brighter than the fill light. In a situation like this, I would recommend experimenting with the lighting ratios to see what pleases you most.

My recommendations if you want to do your own flour photo shoot

  1. Do it outdoors if you possibly can! If you have to do it indoors, be aware that you will have a fine dust of flour covering everything, and a thick pile of flour on the floor. And be aware that flour gets very sticky when it gets damp, so I recommend cleaning it up as soon as possible after the shoot!
  2. Think about the set. Do you want it dark? Will it be necessary to do the shoot after dark? If you are not sure, test it. Although we did this shoot after dark, I don’t think that will be necessary if you have some powerful flash heads. It may even be possible to make use of the sun, if there is direct sunlight (best from behind the model I think).
  3. Have a look at flour photos on the web, and then try to add your own thing. For example I found this youtube video quite interesting;
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AcSZaPXHSJ0
  4. Avoid throwing flour directly into your model’s face! Check that she (or he) doesn’t have any reactions to dust, or flour. Don’t let your model freeze to death if you are working outdoors. Ho ho.
maternity photo shoot in Kingston upon Thames, Surrey

Maternity photo shoot in Kingston, Surrey

Maternity photo shoot in Kingston upon Thames, Surrey

This maternity photo shoot was the result of a personal recommendation. My services were  recommended to Rathees and Priya, by Tripti Kaur.  Tripti did Priya’s hair and make up for her wedding.

It is always nice to be recommended!

Tripti must have done a good job of recommending me as a photographer.  Rathees and Priya live in the Midlands, yet they were willing to drive to my studio in Kingston upon Thames for their maternity photo shoot. This is quite a serious committment for a pregnant mum, and I made sure we discussed what Priya would do if her baby arrived early while she was down here. Fortunately everything went smoothly.

To tell the truth, I suspect they also drove the distance because they knew and trusted Tripti as a make up artist.

Make up by Tripti Kaur

I have worked with Tripti a number of times, and she works mostly with Asian brides. My photos may not do full justice to Tripti’s hair styling, because in order to complete the shoot before darkness fell, we went out on location before doing the studio part of the photo shoot. That means the wind got at Priya’s hair before I took the serious studio shots. Aaargh! Never mind… Still looks good though.

Can I do a maternity photo shoot on location and in the studio?

Yes, of course I can. I can do your maternity photo shoot entirely in the studio, or on location, or both. I am a bespoke photographer, and I custom design my photo shoots for my clients. For more information check out my website for the types of photo shoots I offer.

As soon as Tripti had finished working her make up magic, we headed out to our first locationfor. I wanted to take some natural looking shots. But with the sun low in the sky I decided to add some more dramatic photos, with the sun in the frame.

After taking photos at our first location, we headed back to the studio for a change of dress. Then we headed out to our second location. The sun was setting as we arrived, but I took advantage of the night sky to provide a nice background for some atmospheric photos.

After the sun had set, we drove back to my studio for the studio shots, plus one more change of outfit.

Love and attention

This particular maternity photo shoot will be memorable for me because Priya and Rathees are such nice people, and together they make a very, very charming couple. I was touched by the love, the care, and the consideration that is evident as Rathees looks after his wife.  At times like this I feel very privileged to be admitted into such a close circle so I can make a photographic record of these special times, and these special relationships. It is a real honour, and it is lovely to be trusted to this job.

After the photo shoot

I had to wait quite a few weeks before Priya and Rathees could drive down to KIngston upon Thames, for their viewing in my studio. I was delighted to meet little Janvi, who is an exceptionally beautiful baby girl. Priya also brought me some cake from the “Baby Shower” for me! Although Rathees and Priya are clients, and I have a professional relationship with them, I feel I have made some new friends in the Midlands.

I pride myself on finding out what my clients want, and then helping them get that. This is why all my photo shoots, maternity or otherwise, are designed for each client. Rathees and Priya asked me if I could include a small number of their own photos in the album I designed. These photos were taken by family friends at the “baby shower” they had in their home before Janvi was born. At times like this I am willing to include a few photos like this, as long as there are just a few of them. In my eyes the album is more important than my vanity as a photographer, and I understand why it is nice for new parents to want a single record of such a special time.

Would you like to hire me for a maternity, baby or family photo shoot?

Do you like the photographs on my website?  Would you like me to capture special images of your family and loved ones? Click here if you are thinking of booking me for a maternity photo shoot or any other kind of family photo shoot.
maternity photo shoot in Kingston upon Thames, Surrey maternity photo shoot in Kingston upon Thames, Surrey maternity photo shoot in Kingston upon Thames, Surrey maternity photo shoot in Kingston upon Thames, Surrey maternity photo shoot in Kingston upon Thames, Surrey maternity photo shoot in Kingston upon Thames, Surrey maternity photo shoot in Kingston upon Thames, Surrey

Technical photography stuff

When I shoot on location, I always ask myself; “where is the light coming from?” “what is the nature of the light”, “how am I going to use the light that is available?”, and “am I going to complement it with my own lighting?”

Shooting with the sun in frame, a photographer needs to reduce the apparent brightness of the sun. As always, the options for controlling the exposure are the ISO, the shutter speed, and the aperture. However, depending on the flash system you are using it may not be possible to use a shutter speed faster than perhaps in the region of 1/250 of a second or so.

The shot with the sun in the background was taken using the flash on full power. The ISO was 100, the shutter speed was 1/200s, and the aperture was F20. In addition the lens had a 3 stop neutral density (ND)  filter that cuts the amount of light entering the camera by 7/8th (Ie it only lets 1/8th of the light through).

creative fashion shoot with Linda Blissett

Creative Fashion Shoot with Designer Linda Blissett and team

Creative Fashion Shoot with Linda Blissett, Cerys Wrigley-Moss, Karen Messam and Teresa Opiala

This creative fashion shoot was inspired by a series of photographs taken by Lindsay Adler.

The Aim

I wanted my model to wear red, or possibly red and black, against a red background. Her make up would have to match, and I wanted to add movement into some of the images.

The Creative Team

For a fashion shoot like this it is important to have a good team. The first thing I did was invite Linda Blissett to come on board as the clothing designer and stylist.  I have admired Linda’s style for a long time, and I realised that some of her designs would be ideal for this project. I was also eager to meet her, because she has always been very friendly on the phone, and chatting online.

I was delighted when Linda agreed, and once she was on board everything became very easy for me. That is because Linda invited the rest of the team without me having to do anything. Brilliant!

Designer and clothing stylist: Linda Blissett
Model: Cerys Wrigley-Moss
Make up: Karen Messam
Hair stylist: Teresa Anna Opiala

I am happy to say the team worked brilliantly well together, and I have to give a lot of credit to Cerys’s mum Karen Wrigley-Moss too, because she came along and her help was invaluable.

Linda and I chose the garment we felt was most suitable, and we gave Karen Messam and Teresa Opiala free reign to interpret the brief in their own way.

creative fashion shoot with Ian Trayner, Linda Blissett, Cerys Wrigley-Moss, Karen Messam and Teresa Opiala creative fashion shoot with Ian Trayner, Linda Blissett, Cerys Wrigley-Moss, Karen Messam and Teresa Opiala creative fashion shoot with Ian Trayner, Linda Blissett, Cerys Wrigley-Moss, Karen Messam and Teresa Opiala creative fashion shoot with Ian Trayner, Linda Blissett, Cerys Wrigley-Moss, Karen Messam and Teresa Opiala creative fashion shoot with Ian Trayner, Linda Blissett, Cerys Wrigley-Moss, Karen Messam and Teresa Opiala creative fashion shoot with Ian Trayner, Linda Blissett, Cerys Wrigley-Moss, Karen Messam and Teresa Opiala creative fashion shoot with Ian Trayner, Linda Blissett, Cerys Wrigley-Moss, Karen Messam and Teresa Opiala

Photography Methods

This creative fashion shoot was done in my photo studio in Kingston upon Thames, Surrey.

The red background is a paper roll, lit evenly using two studio flash heads, one on either side. These heads were each fitted with a 140x30cm soft box. In some shots, two people, standing at either side, waved a lightweight red cloth up and down. I added some patterns and textures to some of the other images in post production. You may notice I added the appearance of shadows from a tree in one image too.

The face of the model, Cerys Wrigley-Moss, is illuminated using a beauty dish fitted with a grid, and her lower body is illuminated with an LED light panel. The latter provides a continuous light source that is adjustable, and has the same (or very nearly the same) colour temperature as the studio flash heads (ie if the white balance on the camera is set to “flash”, the light from the LED appears to be white too).

What this means, is that the photographercan have some areas of the image blurred (due to movement of the model) while other areas are sharp (due to the speed of the flash). This is accomplished using a slow shutter speed. Finding the best speed is a matter of trial and error, and will depend on the effect the photographer wants to create. In some of the above images, Cerys’s lower body is blurred due to her moving, while her face and head remains sharp.

I also added a speedlight above Cerys’s head to give some highlights to her hair.

 

"Pandora's Box" fantasy photo shoot, Ian Trayner photographer, Yollanda Musa model

Fantasy photo shoot – Pandora’s Box

Fantasy photo shoot with PortraitX and Yollanda Musa

This was a fantasy photo shoot shot under the auspices of PortraitX. The aim was to shoot on location and capture the theme “Pandora’s Box”, with total freedom to re-interpret that story. So, with apologies to the ancient Greeks, this is my own personal version of the story of Pandora’s box.

Pandora’s Box

Once upon a time, there was a very beautiful young princess named Pandora. She had an uncle who was a powerful magician. He was feared by the people and it was rumoured he had a box that contained devastation. But he loved Pandora, and she loved him.

It came to pass that Pandora’s uncle died, and one day Pandora found herself in his quarters, admiring all the curious and strange artefacts.

One in particular drew her eye; it was a beautiful small box. It fascinated Pandora, so she took it into the castle grounds.

“Surely this box can’t contain anything terrible”, she said to herself. “It is so small, and so beautiful!”

Filled with curiousity, she opened the lid… just a fraction. She peered in, and felt a strange floating sensation, and a feeling of intoxication. She was captivated by a mystical green light, compelling her to open the box fully.

Darkness jumped out and time itself became a chaotic blur…

"Pandora's Box" fantasy photo shoot, Ian Trayner photographer, Yollanda Musa model"Pandora's Box" fantasy photo shoot, Ian Trayner photographer, Yollanda Musa model"Pandora's Box" fantasy photo shoot, Ian Trayner photographer, Yollanda Musa model"Pandora's Box" fantasy photo shoot, Ian Trayner photographer, Yollanda Musa model

"Pandora's Box" fantasy photo shoot, Ian Trayner photographer, Yollanda Musa model

Darkness jumped out and time itself became a chaotic blur…

Photography methods

I used off camera flash with natural daylight. Shooting was a little tricky, because there was a bright sun and many small clouds, and the sun kept going behind the clouds.

When Yollanda was sitting on the tree trunk, the sun was behind her (at about 10’o’clock if the camera is at 6’o’clock) and she was illuminated from the right (her front) using a portable flash. This was a 600W battery powered head fitted with a soft box.

The green light shining out from the box was accomplished using two speedlights with green filters. I found that a single speedlight was not sufficient. I also took Yollanda as deep under the weeping willow tree as I could, so the ambient light was as low as possible. The important thing to know when you use coloured filters, is that the brighter the flash, the less it is coloured by the filter. (This is not intuitive until you think about it, then it makes perfect sense). So I used two speedlights, both set at minimum power output, triggered wirelessly using a radio transmitter.

As always when using flash, you are effectively superimposing two exposures in one image; one is the image that is recorded by the ambient light, and the other is the image recorded from the flash. One image. Two superimposed exposures to give a final net exposure. The flash exposure is dictated by the power from the flash and the aperture. The ambient exposure is dictated by the aperture and the shutter speed (both are also affected by the ISO obviously).

Shooting “Darkness”

In the story, when the character “Darkness”  jumps out of the box, I wanted a long exposure in order to show movement, but I also wanted the scene to appear darker overall. The camera was mounted on a tripod to keep it still, and the flash was set to “rear sync”. That means the flash fired at the end of the exposure, not at the beginning. We had to practice quite a bit to get it right, and technically it was quite challenging.

Firstly I had to find an exposure that was long enough to fit in all the action. The image here was exposed for 1.3 seconds! That gives Marcus (who played “Darkness”) enough time to be recorded at his starting position, and then move to his final position before the flash fires. In between he appears as a blur.

But it was a very bright day, so how was I going to avoid overexposing the image? The answer was to use an aperture of F22 plus a 3 stop ND (neutral density) filter. A 3 stop filter reduces the amount of light getting through by 3 stops, that is to say it blocks 7/8 of the light getting through.

So far so good. But could I get the flash bright enough to capture an image at F22 with a 3 stop filter? That is to say, the amount of light has to be sufficient for whatever is 3 stops brighter than F22! I just managed to get away with it, using two 600W flash heads, both fitted with small reflector dishes, and both as close to Marcus’s final position as I could get them. They are just out of shot to the right.

Poor old Marcus, not only did he have to do his leaping and grimacing until we got it right, he also had to look in the direction of 1200W of light flashing in his eyes! But he did an amazing job.

I also like the effect that a 1.3 second exposure has on the smoke, and it was this that suggested that time itself became blurred and chaotic with Darkness jumps out of the box, as stated in the storyline.

Akcnowledgements

Models: Yollanda Musa and Marcus Phoenix Godfrey
Make up: Shahida MUA
Styling: Akasha Asylum

red deer stag in Richmond Park

“Oh Deer” (red deer in Richmond Park)

Photographing wild red deer in Richmond Park

A story of animal instincts

This is the season of the red deer rut, and Richmond Park echoes to the sound of stags bellowing, and the clash of antler against antler. I have become fascinated by the behaviour of the deer, which appears to be much more complex and subtle than the natural history programs on the telly would make it seem.

I am not a wildlife photographer, so my photographs of the red deer in Richmond Park are just taken as a hobby. Nevertheless, those of you who are familiar with my fashion photography will know I like to “tell a story” with my photographs. In this blog post I present a series of photographs that tell a true story from real life.

“Stag A”

The morning I took these photos, I came across “Stag A” on my way into the park. He had about 6 does with him, and I took several photos, mainly of the stag, because he was so strikingly handsome!

red deer stag in Richmond Park red deer stag in Richmond Park red deer stag in Richmond Park _red deer stag in Richmond Park red deer stag in Richmond Park red deer stag in Richmond Park red deer stag in Richmond Park red deer stag in Richmond Park red deer stag in Richmond Park red deer stag in Richmond Park red deer stag in Richmond Park

“Cheeky jackdaws”

I love the way the deer appear to be oblivious to the “cheeky” jackdaws that land on them, even on their faces! Sometimes the birds tug at the deers’ hair quite powerfully. I am not sure why they do that at this time of year, because this is not nest building season, so they can’t be after the hair for nesting.

After a while I walked on and had other encounters in the park. But later, as I am walking back towards home to get my breakfast, I pass Stag A with his does once more. A few yards further on, I find myself approaching “Stag B” who has three females with him. He is about 200 yards from Stag A, and as I approach, Stag B starts grunting and bellowing. I don’t know if my approach triggered his vocalisations, but I do get the impression that sometimes the approach of people will start them off on their displays.

“Stag B”

Here is Stag B with “his” three does, on my path;

red deer in Richmond Park red deer in Richmond Park red deer in Richmond Park red deer in Richmond Park

When Stag B starts his grunting and bellowing, it attracts the attention of Stag A, who is now behind me. In fact I am standing more or less in the middle between them.

So now Stag A starts bellowing from somewhere behind me, and these photos shows Stag B looking towards Stag A…

red deer in Richmond Park

red deer in Richmond Park

In fact Stag A is already on his way! He is not quite running, but he is moving swiftly, and in a very purposeful manner directly towards Stag B…

red deer in Richmond Park

Stag A passes close to me…

red deer in Richmond Park

Stag B watches as Stag A approaches…

red deer in Richmond Park

Then Stag B turns away and seems to be retreating. Or maybe not? The two stags face each other and walk side by side for a short while. Are they sizing each other up? Surely both stags must know each other quite well already, being neighbours?

red deer in Richmond Park red deer in Richmond Park red deer in Richmond Park

Then they go at it. I did not take any photographs of the fight because I could only see the very tops of their backs. When stags fight, they get their heads right down to the ground, and the fighting stags were almost completely hidden behind tall grass and a slight hillock. But as soon as they started fighting, the three does that were with Stag B, move fast and “purposefully” directly to join the does that were already with Stag A.

This was the most surprising part of it all to me; the way these does seemed to know exactly where to go, and the fact they went there without any hesitation. Here is a photo showing them moving at some speed. Note how their ears are pinned back as they listen to clash of antler against antler, as the two stags fight each other behind them.

red deer in Richmond Park

After a brief struggle, which couldn’t have lasted for more than 20 seconds or so, Stag A is victorious. He seems a bit “worked up” and does some more “triumphant bellowing” (Stag A is the one on the left)…

red deer in Richmond Park red deer in Richmond Park

Then he follows the three does, moving fast and with apparent “purpose”, he passes close by me. He looks to me like he “has something on his mind”. He passed very close to me, as you can see…

red deer in Richmond Park red deer in Richmond Park

To the victor, the spoils

The next bit I did not manage to photograph unfortunately because I was not looking in the right direction at the right time. But a few moment later when I looked back at Stag A, he was just getting off one of his “new does” whom he had just mounted.

red deer in Richmond Park

So there you have it; a tale of “animal intincts”, full of passion and excitement!

bridal photo shoot with Amber Joseph

Bridal fashion shoot using natural light

What is a bridal fashion shoot?

A bridal fashion shoot is a photo shoot with a model wearing a bridal gown. The model here is Amber Joseph.

Can you do a bridal fashion shoot using only natural light?

Yes. Of course. But you need to use the available light to your advantage. It is necessary to see how the light is, and position the model accordingly.

I often use portable flash because it  (potentially) gives much more control and versatility over the lighting, and hence the images that are created. But it is extra weight to carry around, and takes time to set up.

To a limited extent natural light can be manipulated, for example by using a reflector. It is also faster working with natural light because you don’t have to position any flash heads, or measure their light output. If you are using natural light and working in “aperture priority”, it is easier and faster to change your aperture than if you are using manualy controlled (off camera) flash. So in a way it “seems” as if taking photogarphs using natural light is faster and easier. But is it faster and easier for taking really good photographs? creative photographs? and photographs that stand out from the crowd? Photos that make the eye linger?

In my opinion a good understanding of how the direction and “quality” of light affects photographs is just as important for natural light photography as for flash photography.

Our bridal fashion shoot

I took these photos on a workshop at Horsley Park, organised by Pete Bristo.  The model for this bridal fashion shoot was Amber Joseph. I have included a “fun” photo that shows that Amber is not only a beautiful model, but a “good sport” with a sense of humour.

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Adding a sense of movement

This image was created by merging two photographs together. I was not planning to do that when I took the photos, and was not using a tripod, so it was necessary to line the photos up and do a few minor adjustments to where things were!

bridal fashion shoot, natural light, Ian Trayner, photographer-in-surrey.net, Horsley Park

Acknowledgement

Model: Amber Joseph
Locations: Horsley Park

Ian Trayner, Clarissa Holder, athletic photo shoot

Model portfolio photo shoot

Clarissa Holder is an agency-signed model, and she wanted to expand her portfolio. So I set up a model portfolio photo shoot for her.

What makes a good model portfolio?

A model portfolio should show variety, while remaining within the type of work the model wishes to do. The images should be of the highest standard possible. Our perception of how good a model is will be influenced by the quality of the images in her portfolio. And the quality of these images will depend on the skills of the photographer, and the creative team.

The creative team for this photo shoot

In my opinion, the quality of a creative team is crucially important if you want to create great images.  For this shoot, in addition to the photographer and the model, Donna Harris was the make up artist, and Evelyn Tolu (aka MissGoodliving) was the stylist.

Our remit

Our aim was to show the the beauty of the model’s face and body in a tasteful and artistic way. Although Clarissa has a very athletic body, we decided not to go all out to show that. This is because our aim was to create images that are useful for Clarissa’s portfolio, so we decided to take less specialized images. Of course it is impossible not to notice Clarissa’s athleticism, but it comes across more subtly – almost as a side product of the images.

In the time we had available, we set ourselves the following remit;

  1. To use a pale background to create simple images that show off Clarissa’s figure (ie “high key” photography)
  2. To use a dark background and coloured lights for something more unusual (ie “low key” photography)
  3. To take some classic beauty portraits
  4. To edit all the photos for colour and monochrome (black and white). This adds to variety and gives “more bang for your buck”. Of course the effects of the coloured lights are not visible in the monochrome images shown here (I may post them at a later date).

Donna gave Clarissa one “look” for the first two parts of the shoot, and she gave her a new make up look for the beauty shots.

Some images from the photo shoot

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Photography methods

Notice how my lighting has been designed to show the beauty of Clarissa’s face throughout.

An observant person may have noticed, looking at the image of Clarissa holding the hockey stick across her shoulders, that while she is brightest on the left side of the image, the background is brightest on the right side of the image. The effect of this is that she is brighter than the background on the left, and darker than the background on the right. Most people would not consciously notice this, although the effect adds something to the image at a subconscious level.

Would you like your own model portfolio photo shoot?

I enjoy bringing my creative fashion photography skills to the general public. Would you like your own model portfolio photo shoot? You do not have to be a model – everyone has the right to enjoy some creative photography. Imagine showing them to your granchildren one day; “Wow gran, you were really hot!”?

Or… maybe you know someone who would love to receive a creative “model portfolio photo shoot” as a gift? It is not just the experience, they will have the images “in perpetuity”. Photo shoots make excellent and unusual gifts.

“Beauty lighting”

For the penultimate image I wanted (1) beautiful lighting on Clarissa’s face, (2) a blurred but textured background, (3) a relatively shallow depth of field so that only her face is sharply in focus, and (4) a very soft light coming from behind and to the side. The purpose of this last light was to softly and subtely show the very beautiful lines of Clarissa’s cheek, jaw, neck, clavicle and shoulder.

For the final image, I wanted (1) beautiful lighting on Clarissa’s face, (2) a shallow depth of field to focus the viewer’s attention on Clarissa’s facial features, especially her eyes, and (3) I wanted to create a continuous dark curve down one side of Clarissa’s face and body, on the far side from the main light. For you to see this clearly I will have to show you the whole image (from which the image above has been cropped). To create this dark line all I had to do was prevent light from hitting her on this side. Just off camera to the right there is a black surface which blocks light coming from the right, and minimises the amount of light, coming from other directions, that is reflected back on to the model.

Please send me an e-mail if you would like to see coloured versions of these photos. You can find my e-mail address on the main part of my website.

model portfolio photo shoot, fashion photo shoot, fitness model, Clarissa Holder, Ian Trayner

The creative team for this model portfolio photo shoot

Model: Clarissa Holder, signed to ModelsPlus model agency
Make up: Donna Harris
Stylist: Evelyn Tolu (aka MissGoodlving)

The ladies will probably kill me for choosing this image to publish! But I think it shows what fun we had.

Donna Harris, Clarissa Holder, Evelyn Tolu, model portfolio photoshoot

 

Rihanna-inspired photo shoot, part 2

Fashion photo shoot inspired by Rihanna

This photo shoot was inspired by a character that Rihanna plays in the film “Battleship“. She plays a small and very feminine “weapons officer”, who is totally at home in a very macho environment. Our “macho environment” is a large warehouse/factory that was originally used for building submarines! Although it is no longer used for that purpose.

Selected images from the photo shoot

I already shared some photos from the first part of this shoot (although I have just added some “behind the scenes” shots taken by Martin Brown to that post). Now I am sharing a few action shots, plus one more portrait of Yollanda’s face. This is because I want to show the quality of Viya La Belle’s make up.

When factory catches fire, Yollanda has to act, and act fast.

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Photography methods

In order to capture a sense of movement as Yollanda runs, I “dragged the shutter” and panned the camera to create the linearly blurred background. But I also wanted to see Yollanda clearly, so I added some rear sync flash, to freeze her action in the final instant of the exposure.

So, the resulting images of Yollanda running are in effect two images captured in the same exposure, and superimposed on each other. One is a slow exposure using ambient light, and the other is a frozen moment as the flash fires.

Acknowledgements

Model: Yollanda Musa
Make up: Viya La Belle
Photographer’s assistant: Martin Brown

Behind the scenes photos by Martin Brown

These “behind the scenes” photos were taken by Martin Brown, and I am very grateful to him for allowing me to share them with you.

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