Category Archives: Fashion photo shoot

model experience photo shoot with an equestian theme

“Equine beauty” photo shoot

What is an “equine beauty” photo shoot?

An “equine beauty” photo shoot is a “model experience” photo shoot with a horse.

There isn’t really an accepted convention for what to call these photo shoots. One could call it a “model experience” photo shoot, or a “glamour shoot with a horse”. But I tend to call them “equine beauty” photo shoots. There is a risk people will think it is the horse that is meant to be beautiful. But of course all horses are beautiful!

But whatever you call this type of photo shoot, the aims are always as follows;

  1. To capture the young lady looking good
  2. To show the relationship between the young lady and her horse
  3. To show the horse looking good
  4. To do all this safely

The photos in this blog post were taken at the stables where the horse lives, in Sussex.

Equine photography

Equine photography needs special skills. Some photographers become specialists who only do equine photography. Many of these photographers are horse riders themselves, so they are immersed in the subject, and understand exactly what the client is likely to desire in the postures of their horses.

It is necessary to understand the conventions that govern whether the horse “looks good”. For example, it is considered very important that the horse’s ears are directed forwards, as in all the photos shown here. This often causes problems, because horses are “prey animals” and their ears are constantly reacting to noises that come to them from all directions. One can try making unexpected noises in order to attract the attention of the horse’s ears, but it seems most horses rapidly acclimatise to new sounds. Furthermore, there is always a risk that a nervous horse will be upset by unusual sounds.

Showing the relationship between the horse and “model”

Usually, but not always, the “model” will be the person who owns the horse. And because of the investment of time and money involved, and the importance of capturing good images, I always recommend hiring a professional make up artist for this kind of photo shoot.

Speaking in general, photographs that “tell a story” work well. One of the aims of this type of equine photography is to show the relationship that exists between the horse and (usually) it’s owner.

Many people who own and ride horses have photographs, but it is relatively unusual to get “glammed up” in order to have photographs taken of you with your horse! So this type of photo shoot becomes a special experience as well.

So we want the owner to be “glammed up” according to what they feel comfortable with, we want to capture the relationship between the owner and the horse, we want the horse to “look good”, and we want to do it all safely.

Health and safety

There are also significant health and safety concerns, because horses are very heavy and immensely stong animals. They can quite easily break the bones in your foot if they step on it for example. So one has to be careful. It is also wise for a photographer to check that his professional public liability insurance covers him to photograph horses.

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Photography methods

The two photographs of the model against the sky were lit using battery powered studio flash. Actually I used the trusty Ilux Summit 600, which happens to be the type of unit I own.

All the other photographs were taken using only natural light.

Incidentally, some horses are totally happy with flash, but others are not happy. Horses vary a great deal in their personalities. Some horses are much more nervous than others, and even the appearance of a lighting modifier sitting atop a tall stand will spook some horese.

Personally I prefer to shoot horses using natural light. So it is important to position your subjects so the light upon them is flattering.

Would you like to hire me for a professional photos shoot?

 

Model Experience photo shoot with C Walé Beauty

Photos from a “Model Experience photo shoot”

But what is a “Model Experience” photo shoot?

The aim is to give a client a complete “model experience”, but without the pressure to “perform” that a real model might have to deal with. I want your experience to be relaxing, memorable and enjoyable. You can even bring your own music (speakers are provided). In addition of course we will create some beautiful professional images.

Because I only book one “Model Experience” photo shoot per day, I am able to spend as much time as necessary to create some beautiful images. I don’t like watching the clock too much when I am shooting, and I would rather spend a little more time (if necessary) to capture something excellent. In general I allow up to three hours shooting time, but if things are going well, and we both want to continue, I won’t necessarily cut off the shoot until we are happy. You would be surprised how quickly three hours disappears if you are working with different looks, especially if the shoot is split between the studio and a location.

What if I don’t know “how to model”?

Most people aren’t born knowing how to be a good model. Don’t worry, because I will guide you if necessary.

All my photo shoots also include a pre-shoot consultation, during which we will explore what you want to get out of your shoot. We can call upon all my experience, and work in various styles. Have a look at the “Fashion Style” section (with it’s submenu) on my website for inspiration. You can also show me photos by other photographers at your consultation.

Make up by C Walé Beauty

“Model Experience” photo shoots make use of the skills of a professional make up artist. I work with several professional make up artists, all of whom I know and trust. The make up artist on this particular shoot was Caroline of C Walé BeautyIt is always a pleasure working with Caroline. She is a very reliable make up artist, who works wonders with make up and hair styling. She also has a facebook page here.

In this photo shoot, Caroline created a traditional Nigerian look. Twice. And it should be obvious that in this particular shoot, the model’s hair was not the focus of Caroline’s attention! I did not realise how much is involved in getting those head scarves to look really good.

Would you like to book me for your own “model experience” photo shoot?

If you would like to go through the “model experience”, have a look at my “booking a professional photo shoot” page.

Professional photo shoots make excellent and unusual gifts

Click on this link for a short “behind the scenes” video clip

model experience photo shoot, Ian Trayner photographer, C Walé Beauty

model experience photo shoot, Ian Trayner photographer, C Walé Beauty

model experience photo shoot, Ian Trayner photographer, C Walé Beauty

model experience photo shoot, Ian Trayner photographer, C Walé Beauty

 

model experience photo shoot, Ian Trayner photographer, C Walé Beauty model experience photo shoot, Ian Trayner photographer, C Walé Beauty model experience photo shoot, Ian Trayner photographer, C Walé Beauty

 

 

commercial fashion photo shoot in Kingston upon Thames

Commercial fashion photo shoot in Kingston

Commercial fashion photo shoot for Mimi Florence Designs

Mimi Florence Designs is run by a gifted mother of three beautiful kids. She loves to crochet and make jewellery. Each item is custom made for the client. We set up a commercial fashion photo shoot to provide high quality images for her.

Personally I would describe designs from Mimi Florence as “extremely flattering for ladies who have lots of self confidence”. I mean particularly women who feel good about their bodies.

But look at my images from the photo shoot, and judge for yourself.

Commercial fashion photo shoot for Mimi Florence Designs, photography by Ian Trayner Commercial fashion photo shoot for Mimi Florence Designs, photography by Ian Trayner Commercial fashion photo shoot for Mimi Florence Designs, photography by Ian Trayner Commercial fashion photo shoot for Mimi Florence Designs, photography by Ian Trayner Commercial fashion photo shoot for Mimi Florence Designs, photography by Ian Trayner Commercial fashion photo shoot for Mimi Florence Designs, photography by Ian Trayner

 

 

Commercial fashion photo shoot for Mimi Florence Designs, photography by Ian TraynerCommercial fashion photo shoot for Mimi Florence Designs, photography by Ian Trayner

Commercial fashion photo shoot for Mimi Florence Designs, photography by Ian TraynerCommercial fashion photo shoot for Mimi Florence Designs, photography by Ian Trayner

Technical info about setting up this commercial fashion photo shoot

Shooting high key in the studio

For the high key shots I used pretty standard high key lighting. I used two flash heads for lighting the white background, one on each side. These were each fitted with a tall slim softboxes. For the key light I used a 1m deep octaganol softbox with grid. I angled the key light with care so that it gave (a) flattering directional light on the models and (b) a good spread of light on the ground at their feet.

Yollanda’s hair obliged me to move the key light to the “less convenient” side of my studio, that is to say the right hand side, looking at the model from the camera. This side is less convenient solely because of the shape of my studio, and there is less room for putting lights on the right than on the left. If I had not done this, I would have been struggling with a shadow on Yollanda’s face from her hair (because her hair has a parting on her left, which is the right as you look at her from the camera).

Shooting outdoors using natural light

When we went outdoors I used only natural light. The location is the garden at the back of my photo studio in Kingston upon Thames. If you look at the very last photo, Michelle’s eyes are looking more or less in the direction of the sun, which was already quite low in the sky. Michelle is the model with slightly wavy hair, who is wearing the pink top. The models were sitting in dappled shade under a tree. Because sometimes the sun threw displeasing bright patches of light on the models, I had an assistant (actually it was Venus, the make up artist) hold up a semi-translucent screen between the sun and the models.

Also, because I needed more light coming onto the models from camera left, I had another assistant hold up a large white reflective screen (by large, I mean something like 6 feet by 4 feet). This threw just the right amount of light back onto the models faces. This combination gave a very pleasing natural light effect. Unless you were an experienced photographer, you probably wouldn’t notice that the ambient light had been “modified”.

The creative team behind this photo shoot

Photographer: Ian Trayner
Models: Yollanda Musa and Michelle Chaxs
Make up: Venus (search instagram for @_makeupby_vee_)
Designer: Mimi Florence Designs

creative fashion shoot with Linda Blissett

Creative Fashion Shoot with Designer Linda Blissett and team

Creative Fashion Shoot with Linda Blissett, Cerys Wrigley-Moss, Karen Messam and Teresa Opiala

This creative fashion shoot was inspired by a series of photographs taken by Lindsay Adler.

The Aim

I wanted my model to wear red, or possibly red and black, against a red background. Her make up would have to match, and I wanted to add movement into some of the images.

The Creative Team

For a fashion shoot like this it is important to have a good team. The first thing I did was invite Linda Blissett to come on board as the clothing designer and stylist.  I have admired Linda’s style for a long time, and I realised that some of her designs would be ideal for this project. I was also eager to meet her, because she has always been very friendly on the phone, and chatting online.

I was delighted when Linda agreed, and once she was on board everything became very easy for me. That is because Linda invited the rest of the team without me having to do anything. Brilliant!

Designer and clothing stylist: Linda Blissett
Model: Cerys Wrigley-Moss
Make up: Karen Messam
Hair stylist: Teresa Anna Opiala

I am happy to say the team worked brilliantly well together, and I have to give a lot of credit to Cerys’s mum Karen Wrigley-Moss too, because she came along and her help was invaluable.

Linda and I chose the garment we felt was most suitable, and we gave Karen Messam and Teresa Opiala free reign to interpret the brief in their own way.

creative fashion shoot with Ian Trayner, Linda Blissett, Cerys Wrigley-Moss, Karen Messam and Teresa Opiala creative fashion shoot with Ian Trayner, Linda Blissett, Cerys Wrigley-Moss, Karen Messam and Teresa Opiala creative fashion shoot with Ian Trayner, Linda Blissett, Cerys Wrigley-Moss, Karen Messam and Teresa Opiala creative fashion shoot with Ian Trayner, Linda Blissett, Cerys Wrigley-Moss, Karen Messam and Teresa Opiala creative fashion shoot with Ian Trayner, Linda Blissett, Cerys Wrigley-Moss, Karen Messam and Teresa Opiala creative fashion shoot with Ian Trayner, Linda Blissett, Cerys Wrigley-Moss, Karen Messam and Teresa Opiala creative fashion shoot with Ian Trayner, Linda Blissett, Cerys Wrigley-Moss, Karen Messam and Teresa Opiala

Photography Methods

This creative fashion shoot was done in my photo studio in Kingston upon Thames, Surrey.

The red background is a paper roll, lit evenly using two studio flash heads, one on either side. These heads were each fitted with a 140x30cm soft box. In some shots, two people, standing at either side, waved a lightweight red cloth up and down. I added some patterns and textures to some of the other images in post production. You may notice I added the appearance of shadows from a tree in one image too.

The face of the model, Cerys Wrigley-Moss, is illuminated using a beauty dish fitted with a grid, and her lower body is illuminated with an LED light panel. The latter provides a continuous light source that is adjustable, and has the same (or very nearly the same) colour temperature as the studio flash heads (ie if the white balance on the camera is set to “flash”, the light from the LED appears to be white too).

What this means, is that the photographercan have some areas of the image blurred (due to movement of the model) while other areas are sharp (due to the speed of the flash). This is accomplished using a slow shutter speed. Finding the best speed is a matter of trial and error, and will depend on the effect the photographer wants to create. In some of the above images, Cerys’s lower body is blurred due to her moving, while her face and head remains sharp.

I also added a speedlight above Cerys’s head to give some highlights to her hair.